Nose to Tail: Canines By Design Product Review: Ruffwear® Booties!

Standard
Ruffwear GripTex Booties and Web Master Harness.  Photo from gearfordogs.com

Ruffwear GripTex Booties and Web Master Harness. Photo from gearfordogs.com

Wet, snowy, muddy paw prints… ah, the joys of oncoming winter! With much of Canada and the United States enduring cold, wet weather for up to 8 months at a time, we can’t exactly just press pause on our normal routines and wait for a better day. Kudos to all you weather warriors – rain or shine, sleet or snow – we get on our gear and get our canines out to play, walk and run. I do want to give a special shout out to our canine companions here: While we usually have appropriate footwear on for snow or rain, our canines head out on the bare paws their momma gave them!

Paws are amazing things; incredibly engineered and designed to work. I could write an entire article about their physiological design and how incredibly robust they are… but that wouldn’t get to what I’ve found to help you, and your canine, with those extra-extreme weather days. I would rather introduce you to a company and product line they offer that will not only help with cleanup each time you come back from a messy outing, but also help your canine paws guard against the extreme cold, irritation from being constantly wet and dirty and exposed to man-made items such as snow melt, cut pads or webbing, and even help those dogs prone to yeast infections.

Ruffwear®, Inc. is a company that, according to their website, is inspired to keep people and their canines enjoying their outdoor pursuits, whatever the climate, and since 2000, have been creating functional dog products. You might be interested in their high visibility jacket for your canine so you can be safe on dark wintery night runs. For those of you with extreme adventuring dogs, they do make a harness designed specifically to allow you to lift and lower your dogs safely while out mountain climbing. Ruffwear® thinks outside the box when they come up with new products and, I find, their final piece is always well engineered and does just what they say. Check out their website to view their expansive product line.

Ruffwear Snow Trex Boot.  Photo courtesy of www.ruffwear.com

Ruffwear Polar Trex Boot. Photo courtesy of ruffwear.com

With all that said, I want to focus on Ruffwear’s dog boot line. You might be thinking “a whole line”!? Yes, they make three different boots for three different purposes. They sell them as a set of four, or individually if you need to replace a lost or worn out one. For Northerners that find themselves in deep snow or on ice, their Polar Trex™ boots are a great option. With a secure buckling system and built in insulation, these boots are designed to stay on and provide traction and warmth for both short and longer outings on the ice and snow.

Does your dog have dewclaws up front and on the back? Their Bark’n Boot Liners™ can enhance the fit of the boot if your canine’s legs are thin, and also make putting on the boots a cinch since the dewclaws and other pads are already in the sock!

Polar Trex Boots and Omnijore Ruffwear Harness System.  Photo from blessthisstuff.com

Polar Trex Boots and Omnijore Ruffwear Harness System. Photo from blessthisstuff.com

For less snow but still cold climates, where our canines might be playing in muddy or frosty parks, running on wet rocks and shells at the beach and walking over ice melt (or other abrasive/caustic surfaces), their lighter duty Summit Trex™ Boots might be the right fit. They are great for everyday traction needs and for runs on the bike path.

GripTex Boots in Action!  Photo courtesy of ruffwear.com

GripTex Boots in Action! Photo courtesy of ruffwear.com

If you are like me and other West Coasters that are owned by their adventurous dogs, we tend to find ourselves on a mix of surfaces. Muddy trails, wood chips, beaches with sharp rocks and shells, and the occasional jaunt on concrete… the Grip Tex™ boots answer the call. With a robust Vibram® outsole, these boots will make sure that your canine is sure-footed and safe no matter what their day brings along.

Determining functionality and purpose is so important in a marketplace being blasted with new companies and concepts everyday. We want products to do what they are being sold to do: to work and to perform. Ruffwear boots meet these expectations and, in many ways, exceed them. Best of all, their boots can be washed and air-dried so they are clean and ready for the next adventure!

I wasn’t paid or incentivized by Ruffwear® to write this. I just believe that they are doing the right stuff when it comes to canine focused products. Check out their “find a retailer” to locate a dealer close to you. I can’t wait for Canines By Design to have a store in Victoria! When it happens, this is definitely a company you will see well represented on my shelves.

Please contact me at jeremyryder[@]caninesbydesign.ca if you have questions or comments about Ruffwear products or this blog post. Happy Trails!

Ghosts, Ghouls and Drool: 7 Ways To Prepare your Dog for a Safe Halloween (+ Free Treat Recipe!)

Standard
Ireland Practicing Being A Ghost

Ireland Practicing Being A Ghost

Halloween is fast approaching! For many kids (and some adults too!), that means dressing up as their favorite superhero or Halloween character, lots of candy, and even a little spooking!  For our dogs, especially young puppies, or those that haven’t ever experienced this strange onslaught of the senses, Halloween can be as confusing and scary as a fireworks show!

Think about it: Costumes cover our faces and add weird appendages to our features, strange people come constantly to our front door and yell… loudly! Is it any wonder that many canines display strong anxiety to these things? We might also put our canines right in the thick of it, taking them for a walk or bringing them along as a companion for our little trick or treaters. Imagine what they must be thinking when they come across that scary witch or graveyard of skulls?!

I often talk about the concept of “setting up for success” and for occasions such as Halloween where costumes are meant to evoke strong and sometimes frightening emotions, this concept becomes very important. In the service dog world, we proof and prepare canines for many different scenarios and possibilities that they may encounter during their busy lives helping out their family. In controlled environments, we expose dogs to the lights and sounds of emergency vehicles, encourage volunteers to come dressed in their work clothes to bring along the smells of the community and we have very generous fireman and police officers take time to come to the facilities in full gear, to expose the developing puppies to funny helmets, gas masks, oxygen tanks, and utility belts covered in things that might look like toys. However, for the majority of “household” canines, their exposure and learning experiences are slightly different. Some have a very integrative life, are out in the community all the time (or as much as possible), meeting new people and new things. Others spend some, or all of their lives around a few houses, and the local park. For any dog, at either end of the exposure spectrum, going around the corner and coming face to face with a Yeti, or someone dressed up as our favorite martial arts turtle can be quite a shock, and can evoke emotion and behaviours that we have never witnessed or experienced EVER!

You Thought I was Cute Before!!

You Thought I was Cute Before!!

So what can we do? Here is a list of things to keep in mind around the Halloween season and some ways to make All Hallows’ Eve as positive as possible:

For those of us with canine-enriched lives

  1. Have a good play with your dog at the local park or in your backyard well before you have to start handing out candy. Make sure their needs are met!
  2. Take them for a “business” run (pee and poop) before the trick-or-treaters are out and about. Usually it is still daylight at this point so you will also be less likely to be surprised by a costumed ghoul or ghost. Then take them out after when things have drastically calmed down and most, if not all, of the families have gone home.
  3. Usually someone stays at home to hand out candy. GREAT! Don’t leave your dog in the front room or by the front door unattended where they can be over stimulated by commotion outside and knocking/doorbell ringing. It also avoids any possible escape attempts.
  4. Set up a quiet and safe room for the canine. Put on the TV or turn the radio on with some nice easy listening, and pull the blinds over the window. For some, just running a fan in the room is enough white noise to block out stimulation happening at the front door. Make sure the room is safe for the dog, whatever their age. If they become stressed, they can act out on furniture, electrical cords, and doors. Set them up for success by minimizing dangerous items.
  5. If you are at the front door, take some time to check on them at a decent frequency. Reinforce their quiet behaviour with verbal praise and even the occasional delicious treat. (It is treat night for everyone else, after all! See below for a great recipe.) If they become anxious or unsure, spend some time to quiet them down and redirect these tense emotions towards a fun or happy thing. Get out their favorite toy or puzzle and have them work through it. Spend a little time running through their various commands so they redirect onto the task at hand, not what is going on outside.
  6. If your dog barks at the doorbell… Contact Canines By Design and we can help fix that, but for now, watch for people coming to the house or tape over the door bell with a sign to say “do not ring”.
  7. Make sure the candy and chocolate is out of reach from them. Also make sure that your children or guests know that the canine cannot have any “people” treats. Many kids like to spread out their candy on the floor to check out their “haul” after trick-or-treating. That’s fine… just maybe close the door to their bedroom first to avoid any canines snacking!

If you are out and come across a dog:

  1. Do not approach (even if you know the dog): Remember you are wearing a costume: Canines are very good at reading body language, facial expressions, and verbal language. We are running around having fun with raised/excited voices and covered faces (masks or makeup)… it doesn’t exactly give them a fair chance to assess the situation. If you have to go say hello, remove your mask and return your emotional level back to a relaxed and calm state before doing so. Even your own canine may second-guess that it is actually you when you are dressed up to scare!
  2. If you are going up to a house and you hear a dog barking from very near or right behind the door, turn around and head to the next house. While we want to give the benefit of the doubt to those caregivers, we cannot assume that the dog will be OK with us near their house and their people. They are already showing sign of arousal and they may make the wrong assumption and turn a fun night into a negative one.

MOST Importantly… Have FUN with your families this Halloween! While canines might not get the concept of dressing up and going door to door, they can still have fun and a delicious treat too! Try this easy recipe:

Simple Peanut Butter Pumpkin Canine Treats:

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups Peanut Butter (Natural)

1 cup of 100% Pure Pumpkin Puree, canned. (Not Pumpkin Pie Filling)

1 ¾ cups Whole Wheat Flour

Directions:

  1. Preheat over to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, stir together peanut butter and pumpkin. Sift in the flour ¼ cup at a time just until the dough in no longer sticky.
  3. Roll the dough out between two sheets of parchment paper until it is about ¼” thick.
  4. Use your favorite puppy or Halloween-themed cookie cutter to cut the shapes. Place on prepared cookie sheets
  5. Bake @ 350 for 8-10 minutes (non-convection setting). Let cool completely. Store in an airtight container (2 week shelf life) or freeze for up to 3 months.
Ready To Hit The Town!!

Zoom and Ember Ready To Hit The Town!!

NOTE: I would like to thank Kathryn Koh for the photos she sent me to use in this blog post.  Kathryn is very involved with my school, Bergin University, back in Sonoma Valley, California.  She volunteers to take many of the beautiful pictures of all the Bergin dogs, she is an active puppy raiser, trainer, foster home, canine caregiver, and helps out the school anyway she can!!  Many Thanks from here in Victoria!