Nose to Tail: Be Prepared for a Canine Sleepover

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Zoom and Ireland Road Trippin!!

Zoom and Ireland Road Trippin!!

Are you hosting a canine sleepover party? Maybe you are helping out family or friends by taking care of their dog while they travel or head for a much-needed vacation? There are always a lot of considerations to think about when leave our canine in someone else’s care or do the same for them so I thought I would compile a few checklists of things to remember to help make preparations easier!

Short-Term Stay (e.g. one day):

  1. Enough food for the meals of the day.

NOTE: If your canine is on a special diet, prepare all the components before hand and write up some feeding instructions. Also bring their treats along if they have a sensitive stomach.

  1. Leash, Harness, and Collar (Make sure their ID and contact info is up to date!)
  2. Any medications needed for the day. Ensure instructions for proper timing/dosage.
  3. Let your “puppy-sitter” know about any specific behavioural things your canine may do throughout the day that is unique to them and also make sure you give your contact information (and a backup!) in case anything unforeseeable comes up.
  4. Before they leave on their adventure, take a moment to snap a photo close up of their face as also a full body shot in case anything happens and they bolt from your puppy sitter.

Long-Term (e.g. one week):

  1. Enough food for everyday that you are gone for. I like to leave a little extra (a couple extra meals worth) in case travel plans change.

NOTE: If your canine is on a special diet, prepare all the components before hand and write up some feeding instructions. Also bring their treats along if they have a sensitive stomach.

  1. Any medications needed for the day. Ensure instructions for proper timing/dosage.
  2. Leash, Harness, and Collar (Make sure their ID and contact info is up to date!!)… add an extra tag for the time you are away that has your puppy sitter’s information on it (name, address, e-mail, phone number) as this will speed up the pup being returned if he/she decides to go on a walk-about.
  3. Provide your sitter with a copy of your canine’s vet records (digital or paper) and give their veterinarians information (name, contact info, address, phone number) along with the details in case a medical emergency arises. If they cannot make it to your regular veterinarian, having the copy will give any veterinarian the background information they will need to answer any questions.

NOTE: Agree beforehand what the protocol will be if a medical emergency arises (how costs will be covered, how the caregivers will be contacted, etc.). Having this planned will make an unplanned stressful time much more manageable.

  1. If you have the time, go out with your puppy sitter for a walk or two, and maybe even a play, so that they can get comfortable with your canine’s behaviours and have the opportunity to ask any questions.

NOTE: This is a great time to go through their command list so the sitter knows how to ask the canine to perform a particular instruction (include this list as a part of your write-up!)…. Imagine not knowing the instruction that the pup waits for to pee!

  1. Write up a “day in the life of _____” so that the puppy sitter knows what your dog gets for activity on a regular basis. By sticking as close to their regular activity levels and schedules, the canine will be less likely to “act out” or develop new, and not necessarily productive, behaviours. It will also inform the sitter of any special things they may need to do (e.g. ear cleaning solution/wipes after a swim day) that they don’t necessarily perform on their own canines.
  2. Provide your destination contact information for your puppy sitter so that they can call or contact you even if their cell phones aren’t working, or they are busy visiting a family event. It might not be the best time, but emergencies never happen when the timing is “good.”.
  3. Before they leave on their adventure, take a moment to snap a photo close up of their face as also a full body shot in case anything happens and they bolt from your puppy sitter.

If your pup is prone to anxiety, then a great extra to bring along is a familiar smelling blanket or towel (something they sleep with) so that they can have some familiar smells around them when you are away and can help decrease stress caused by the new environment. If you don’t have a towel or blanket, then sleep in a old t-shit for a couple of nights and pack that along and it will help both with short and long-term stays!

I have also attached a checklist in .PDF file that can be opened with any .PDF reader to help make your trip easier.  Click the link below, download, print it off, share it with friends!!  And don’t forget, enjoy your trip!!

Canines By Design Sleepover,Vacation Checklist

 

Restricted Lifestyle? No Problem! Canine Hydrotherapy Might Be Right For You!

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Husky Hydrotherapy

Husky Hydrotherapy

This week’s article is all about alternative medicine and exercise plans for canines. Specifically, I thought we’d take a look at hydrotherapy. What is dog hydrotherapy? Well, we’ll get there. But first, I want to introduce the concept of appropriate exercise.

Body and brains: What appropriate exercise means!

When professionals in the dog world talk about exercise, the phrase “appropriate exercise” often arises. Used as a blanket term, the notion that not all exercise is appropriate for all ages and sizes of canines can get one thinking. A simple comparison would be comparing the activity level of a young German shepherd to that of a geriatric Pug. Appropriate activity isn’t saying that the Pug is incapable of any activity, but rather the type activity the Pug engages in should be incorporate variables such as his age, any underlying medical conditions such as heart condition and any physiologic limitations such as arthritis.

The equation gets even more complicated when we start to think about physical and mental exercise.   Both mental and physical requirements change throughout a canine’s lifetime, just as they do for humans. Finding a balance to keep their lives enriched and happy can become tricky when genetic and age-related changes (like arthritis) begin affecting the exercise equation. While an older or injured (or both) canine might not have the physical ability to run and play on land, their mental well being is reliant on them maintaining a lifestyle balance that still includes exercise, play and all those things that make a dog a dog!

What is canine hydrotherapy?

This is where hydrotherapy comes in. The dictionary defines hydrotherapy as the therapeutic use of water where wet heat and wet cold are applied to help in medical treatments, strengthen muscles, restore motion, and clean and heal flesh. (Merriam-Webster, 2014). In other words, we can think about it as time spent in the water, walking, swimming, and exercising.

Golden Relaxing

Golden Relaxing

Hydrotherapy offers many, many benefits for both humans and canines. Because of the properties of water, the effects of gravity are lessened when our bodies are submersed, making us feel lighter. While this takes pressure off joints, the submersion in varying temperatures of the water can help with inflammation of joints and muscle recovery from major surgeries and other musclo-skeletal damage (Mooventhan and Nivethitha, 2014). Hydrotherapy has even been shown to help with cardiovascular issues such as blood pressure (Mooventhan and Nivethitha, 2014).

These findings are now being applied to canines! We once thought that canines with restricted lifestyles, whether it was due to age, medical or otherwise, meant having a very bored pup giving us those long looks and big eyes saying “please, lets go for a run… if only for a minute.” There are many applications of hydrotherapy (and physiotherapy) and resources to help you try them, with long-term rehab facilities for canines and animals becoming the norm in many cities across Canada and the United States. Check out this example: Coastal Canine Hydrotherapy and Fitness Centre on Vancouver Island.

For anyone who is scratching their head, wondering what sort of fun things they can do with a canine who has special needs or a restricted lifestyle, maybe hydrotherapy is an option for you! You may find that a trip to the beach and a dip in the ocean is exactly what you both needed!!

NOTE: It is always important to consult your veterinarian before introducing a new exercise platform for your canine, especially when there may be physiological limitation/conditions that could cause compounding issues.

In 2014, a book was released, “No walks? No worries!: Maintaining wellbeing on restricted exercise”, by Sian Ryan and Helen Zulch. A good source of information, this book will help you understand more of what appropriate exercise is from the viewpoint of entering a period of restrictive lifestyle (e.g. having a major surgery) and provide you with the questions you should ask your veterinarian when the times comes.

Finally, if you have an extra 2 minutes, watch this loving video of Schoep, a canine who lived to TWENTY years of age who benefited from the wonders of hydrotherapy (and A LOT of Love!):

Looking for a good canine life jacket for your new found love of water?  Check out this great line by Ruffwear.  Called the K-9 Float Coat: http://www.ruffwear.com/-9-float-coat?sc=2&category=694, it comes it various sizes and two colors to fit your lifestyle and canine needs.

References:

Merriam-Webster (2014). Hydrotherapy Definition. Retrieved from: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hydrotherapy. Accessed on: September 16, 2014.

Mooventhan A, Nivethitha L. (2014). Scientific evidence-based effects of hydrotherapy on various systems of the body. North Am. J. Med. Sci.; 6: 199-209. Retrieved from: http://www.najms.org/text.asp?2014/6/5/199/132935.Accessed September 16, 2014.

Fall Blues… Back To School and Back to Reality: Fostering Canine Adaptability, not Destruction

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Nick and Rusty Enjoying the Bergin University Master's Class

Rusty (L) and Nick (R) Enjoying the Bergin University Master’s Program

August has faded into September and thousands of students are heading back for another school year. While students might be dragging their feet, the arrival of fall is usually accompanied by a smile of relief from their parents! (OK, not for parents in B.C., but hopefully the strike will end soon) It means a return to normalcy and a schedule. Summertime activities keep everyone busy and entertained, including your canines: Everyone is home, people are happy and excited, and nice weather usually means frequent trips to a favorite beach, lake or park. When September hits, the kids sigh with procrastination, the parents sigh with relief… and, in many cases, our canines sigh with sadness because their home dynamic changes drastically.

At home, things can get quiet quickly without children playing and moms and dads temporarily home on holidays. Two months is enough time for this level of elevated activity and companionship to become a constant fixture in our canine’s life. With back-to-school and back to work, schedules are shuffled and new routines are made. Sometimes in all the chaos, our furry companions can get missed, and some assurances that they have become used to, and somewhat reliant on, might not happen.

I could spend this whole article talking about variables and how they can have a resultant effect on your canine, but my goal here is to help you ensure your canine has the skills to deal with changes in their routines and help make sure they are adaptable and not destructive.

Pro Tips:

  1. Start new routines slowly and gradually.
  • If you know there is going to be a schedule change for your canine, start preparing for that change by modifying your current schedule gradually over a few days.
  • Have family help out by explaining why this gradual change is important.
  1. Plan ahead to make sure your canine will still get all their necessary exercise, both mental and physical.
  • We have our social lives, work, friends and an integrated community. Your canine has you and a select few others that they rely on for everything. Don’t forget that! If it means waking up earlier to ensure they have had a decent walk and training session prior to a period of time on their own, then schedule it in!
  • Again, have family help out. If you have children, small 10-minute training sessions can become part of their regular schedules before or after school. These moments can become great family bonding time where everyone is together smiling and having fun… including your puppy.
  • If you think an 8 hour work day feels long for you, try being a dog waiting patiently at home. I am blessed that I work in the canine world, which means Zoom is almost always with me. When he isn’t, we try to think of our day in three-hour blocks. Modify your schedule, utilize a trustworthy neighbor or friend, or join a local community walking group. There are many ways to make sure your pup doesn’t have to spend countless hours and days alone waiting to relieve themselves or go socialize.
  1. Always, always set your canine up for success during alone time.
  • Leave music or the TV on to add some ambient noise to the environment so that the house isn’t silent all day as silence can heighten anxiety in canines.
  • Use the same routine when leaving every time. Tell your canine “you will be back” every time. Offer a Kong with a little peanut butter or frozen pumpkin in it to help ease the initial separation and keep them distracted when you go. Doing this consistently will also help your canine pair “positive feelings and excitement” when you leave versus feelings of negativity and fear.
  • Make sure that your canine is in an environment that is safe and enriched. By cleaning up garbage, removing chewable items (power cords), leaving the floors clean and making sure they have access to safe items (items you have had success leaving with them) such as their bed, you help make sure that if they do become anxious that they don’t take it out on something they shouldn’t.
  • As noted above, make sure both their physical and mental needs are taken care of BEFORE you go. A bored mind will wander and an anxious body will only compound this, creating a situation in which your dog may try or do something they have never done before (e.g. chew furniture).

Taking the mental and physical needs of our canines into consideration during periods of transition and change will only help to make your dog adaptable and flexible, decreasing your already-long list of worries and stress.

If you are unsure of what you can leave or do with your canine in your situation, I’m here to help. Contact Canines By Design and I would be glad to help set you and your canine up for success by creating safe space solutions in and around your home.

3 Ways To Make a Bad Situation the Best It Can Be

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Ziggy and Zoom at the Beach!

As we and our dogs make our way through our daily lives, we hope that every experience is happy and pleasant for our canines! Unfortunately, factors in the environment, like bad encounters with other dogs, bolting away from panic or over-stimulation, can very quickly turn positive situations into negative ones.

It is impossible to plan for everything that could happen. If we tried, I think we might all be walking around in plastic bubbles. However, there are a few preventative measures we can take to help our furry companions, and ourselves, best handle (what could be) a traumatic situation:

  1. KNOW YOUR CANINE:

Knowing your canine means working with them to understand their personalities, their fears and their ambitions (or drives). Armed with this knowledge, we can go through routines and avoid moving too far out of our dog’s “zone of comfort” where a reactive behaviour might trump them using their brainpower.

It also empowers us. The deeper our knowledge of the details, the finer tuned our training can become. Not only can we work through new environments and experiences while feeling at ease that we are not causing undue stress and anxiety, but we can utilize their zone of comfort to help them work through past experiences that have left them anxious or unsure.

If your relationship is new, your canine is recovering from medical issues that can influence behaviour, or you are working through behavioural baggage, please also read the Yellow Dog Project post I wrote a couple months ago and visit their website for more details.

  1. BE ENVIRONMENTALLY AWARE:

Knowing your environment starts with knowing what is going on in your personal space. Ever see someone enter a crosswalk right into traffic because they are texting? They are so absorbed in the task at hand that they don’t even realize they are stepping out in front of a moving car! Some of us are gifted with this ability to know what is going on. It is innate to be aware of our surroundings and it is second nature to use our senses, sight and sound, to know what is going on around us. For others, this type of vigilance requires practice. We get lost in our own thoughts, or in the phone call that just came in, and we become blind to what is occurring around us. Practice will increase this ability. Your range of awareness will grow and so give you more time to create a good situation.

  • Look ahead. If you are walking down a trail, try to look as far ahead as possible to see what is coming up. You can avoid sticky situations with other dogs before they even begin by moving to the side. This includes looking up and down – staying clear of those poisonous plants means one less expensive and stressful trip to the vet.
  • Use your hearing. Many of us live in busy cities and towns and this increases the ambient noise we put up with, and actually habituates and dulls our sense of hearing. Yet, we are really good at picking up noises that “just don’t belong” (e.g. a dog suddenly barking with intention). When that happens, trust your instincts. Take your time, and set up for success.
  1. BRING TREATS WITH YOU:

I never leave home with Zoom without bringing my treat bag that I use for teaching and learning new tricks! Treats, especially items that are high reward for your canine (for Zoom, this might be cheese or chicken), give you a lot of power to make a potentially terrible situation a little better. How many of us didn’t like visiting the dentist when we were kids? Once the dentist brought out the sucker jar when they finished, those little ones would leave with a big smile (or at the very least, stop the waterworks and vocal cord workout!).

The same can happen for a dog. Just like us, they will carry “baggage” from experiences in their lives. These experiences shape them and create the dynamic personalities we can see when we compare brothers and sisters from within a litter. If the worst happens when a situation occurs, one of the simplest things we can do after we have removed them from danger is give a quick task request for a behaviour they can do in their sleep (e.g. sit) to get their focus back to you, and then reward them like you have never done before! Yummy treats, happy faces, a favorite toy, lots of petting, and even some distracted goofing around can immediately help your canine off the “red zone” cliff and get them back on track to “happy land”!

It is important for us as caregivers, and our canines, that we can go about our daily lives without undue stress and fear. Past encounters can be traumatizing to both, but avoiding the outdoors or other people and dogs doesn’t do either you or your canine any good. By knowing our dogs and understanding our environment, we can plan ahead to make every situation as positive as we can. Each positive encounter gives our furry friends and us motivation to continue to grow and the mental strength to work through new and exciting situations… with treats, of course!

Want help understanding your canine? If you might be feeling discouraged because you just can’t seem to keep your canine off the “red zone” cliff, contact me anytime to talk about how we can get you and your dog get back on track and back into your community!

Jeeter and Zoom

Jeter and Zoom

 

 

Nose to Tail Product Review: GoughNuts Toys

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GoughNuts.com Stick

GoughNuts.com Stick

At Canines By Design, we are always looking into new and exciting ways for you and your dog to interact and have fun. Both Zoom and I love checking out new products, games, puzzles, and gear that is geared for positive and safe experiences (and sometimes it’s hard to tell which of us geeking out more!).

I know I don’t have to look too far to find those of you who have a canine with some serious chewing power. I bet they are the kind of dog that has made those “indestructible” claims seem like a bit of a stretch. I also know that this… enthusiasm can make finding appropriate toys difficult, expensive and, frankly, distressing when yet another product fails miserably.

GoughNuts, LLC has created a line of safe dog products, made in the USA, that have specifically catered to the needs of champion chewers. Alongside Mechanical and Polymer Engineers, Goughnuts has developed products made of high quality materials with wear indicators to let caregivers know when the toy’s integrity has been compromised. They also come with a multi-Axis Groove System to help prevent potential choking/air blockage, bite-strength statistics and a return/replace policy for both Canada and the U.S.

Products with these types of considerations make canine safety a top priority, and GoughNuts makes sure customers know it when visiting their website. They go into detail about how to properly size their products based on your canine’s size and also give detailed information about when it is time to remove the toy to ensure your pet stays safe. They make a range of GoughNut Sticks and Rings with different bite strengths and sizes for both small/medium and large dogs, and have also recently released a tug toy and a ball design that follows their strict “Safety-First” policy.

Nothing is indestructible – this is always part of our environmental enrichment discussions with clients. Playtimes with toys should be monitored, especially with strong chewers. Developing safe and enriching spaces means working with the specific personalities, needs, and behaviours of each individual dog as well as all the variables (such as durability and budget) introduced in each case to strike a balance between an entertaining space and a safe one. No one wants to lay on a tile floor in a bare room with nothing to do! The GoughNuts company is helping this process for us all, by ensuring that the products they develop, produce, and promote already encompass major components of canine safety.

Always research your canine-related products. While those that offer bargain prices and multi-packs may seem enticing to those of us who have canines who don’t seem to know their own strength, the level of ingredient control and quality in these products can be quite varied. While I can offer many examples of dog-related surgeries due to the ingestion of toys and other materials in the environment, I thought I would post one that we will all be dealing with right now as it is BBQ season and we are all on the hunt for what we think is a deal: http://www.edmontonsun.com/2014/07/07/woman-hospitalized-by-cheap-bbq-brush.

 

 

 

 

Zone Of Comfort: Make the Most Out of A Stressful Situation

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dockjumping

At Canines By Design we talk a lot about T.A.P. for success, setting-up-for-success, redirection, and proofing.  But one aspect that we have yet to discuss on the blog is working within the “zone of comfort.”

Are you asking yourself “what does that mean?”… or “isn’t that some prop from Get Smart!?”.  Well, we aren’t talking about a Hollywood TV prop, but, like the safe learning space that the (awesome) “cone of silence” was designed to create, building a comfort zone means working with the environment around us to create a positive and, most importantly, educational, experience. And unlike Maxwell Smart’s device, I’ve found a much simpler approach that actually works to achieve the desired outcome!

We all have zones of comfort.  These imaginary force fields around us help dictate our level of ease in social situations, strange environments and when we test new experiences.  Depending on the individual, these zones will vary depending on previous exposure, comfort level, etc. and it is critical to take all factors into account.

Let’s use an example:  Since I work with dogs, sitting on the floor in the middle of 10 full grown canines playing together doesn’t evoke feelings of stress or fear. However, for someone who isn’t used to large dog fests, or only interacted with guard dogs, their perspective on the situation will be totally different.  For someone fearful of canines, such a situation could be so overwhelming that they might shut-down and glean nothing positive from the experience or not even be able to remove themselves from the environment because they are so overwhelmed.  Some dog trainers like to call this “the red zone.”  For the human analogy, we can say this person has started the “flight-or-fight” response.  This response, also known as the acute stress response, is when the sympathetic nervous system responds to the physical or the strong emotional state that has been presented to the body, coordinating various bodily functions (adrenal gland secretion, pupil dilation, increase heart rate, etc.) in order to create the optimum situation for that individual’s survival (1).

Now imagine the situation where we are beginning to expose a newly adopted canine to various environmental factors.  Maybe that dog had spent its first year locked in a backyard, without environmental enrichment.  Maybe that backyard didn’t even have grass or any trees. Now, when we take that pup out and begin to work through different training scenarios, the environment can become very overwhelming, very quickly.  For this particular example, the canine will enter the “red zone” fast – inhibiting their response to our training programs and damaging their overall personal growth.  Part of my graduate thesis examined this phenomenon, and many examples arose in which increased levels of stress (in particular example it was related to training methodology) directly resulted in a decrease in working ability of canines trained for service (2,3,4).

It is therefore very important as caregivers that we keep our canines’ “zone of comfort” in mind when we are out training and setting out educational experiences for success.  Here are some easy ways to keep this in mind while we are out and about:

shield-learning

  1. Keep your dog’s history in mind!
  • If they have had previous negative experiences with something in the environment, their zone for this object/person/dog will be less secure.
  1. Slow and Steady!
  • Fear can be incredibly powerful and debilitating.  We cannot learn when we are in fear for our lives or someone’s well being.  The same goes for canines. Flooding canines emotionally is a very dangerous practice.  Working within what the canine is comfortable with, as slow as it may be, will allow you and your canine to gradually build confidence with that once-scary scenario, and also help you both build a stronger, trusting bond.
  1. Keep it Fun!
  • We always strive to make every situation and experience for canine and caregiver as positive and rewarding as possible.  Success gives everyone a good feeling, and those positive feelings go a long way to help overcome hurdles we encounter and give us further motivation to keep going.

Canines By Design is here for you!  Contact us today to see how our customized approach can help you and your canine work together and create success everyone can see!

1. TheFreeDictionary.com (Medical Dictionary) (2014).  Fight-or-Flight Reaction Definition.  Retrieved from: http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/fight-or-flight+reaction.  Accessed on: July 1. 2014.

2. Hilby, E.F., Rooney, N.J., & Bradshaw, J.W.S. (2004).  Dog training methods: their use, effectiveness and interaction with behavior and welfare.  Anim. Welfare, 13: 63-69.

3. Haverbeke, A., Laporte, B., Depiereux, E., Giffroy, J.M., & Diederich, C. (2008). Training methods of military dog handlers and their effects on the team’s performance.  Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci., 113: 110-122.

4. Haverbeke, A., Messaoudi, F., Depiereux, E., Stevens, M., Giffroy, J.M, & Diederich, C. (2010).  Efficiency of working dogs undergoing a new human familiarization and training program.  J. Vet. Behav., 5: 112-119.

Best Places to Practice Training with your Dog in Victoria, British Columbia

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Here on the blog, I recently wrote about the concept of proofing, and what to proof canine behaviours. Living and exploring in the greater Victoria region, I thought I would share for my fellow Islanders and vacationers alike, some great places that are dog amenable (if not friendly) where you can work on proofing your canine’s behaviours, socialization and have the opportunity to get out as a whole family.

Downtown Victoria:

With a variety of shops, downtown pedestrian walkways, waterfront parks and paths, downtown Victoria offers a wide variety of stimulation for canine and caregiver training. With a lot of activity going on, downtown Victoria will, on average, offer a higher level of stimulation for your canine depending on the time of day you and your furry friend venture around. So, remember to set yourselves up for success and work in environments where you both can succeed. This could mean going out in the early morning when there are less crowds, or being aware of your location and possible “exit” strategies to quieter neighborhood streets if needed. With paved paths and sidewalks, the downtown area offers a good, less muddy, option on those rainy days.

Dallas Road Dog Park:

One of the larger and more popular dog parks in the area, along with an affiliated dog friendly beach and some amazing views, Dallas Road is sure to offer your family a great hour or afternoon. Actively visited, there is always a playgroup to join or use as a proofing situation. Dallas Road can get muddy in spots when it has rained but there is a paved path where you can practice heeling along and also some grassy areas that drain well. Because of its size, Dallas Road Dog Park offers medium to high stimulation, but depending on the weather and the time of day, both low and high levels can be found. Remember to obey off-leash rules. For more info see Paws in Parks.

Butchart Gardens:

Looking for an outdoor event for the whole family or maybe you have relatives or friends visiting but you want to bring Fido along? Perhaps you need a pet friendly spot where you can meet with your friends for a New Years Eve gathering? Butchart Gardens makes the list because the grounds are not only dog friendly, they are dog welcoming! They have recirculating water bowls placed around the grounds and the staff even have biscuits to hand out. Lots of unique smells, sites, and sounds, Butchart Gardens is a great place to practice some proofing, and socialize your canine. Butchart offers a low to medium stimulation and can be a good place to practice on-leash work. NOTE: Because Butchart Gardens are just that, a garden, it is important to make sure you keep track of your sniffing canine so that he/she does not nibble on something exotic and potentially toxic.  It is also the only spot on my list that requires admission (well worth it!!)

Elk Lake/Thetis Lake:

These lakes are two of our family’s favorite spots in Victoria. Both areas offer amazing views, beautiful trails and facilities. Elk Lake has a well-maintained 10km loop and Thetis offers a ~3km or ~4.4km loop as its first accessible activity. Both areas have many more trails to explore above and beyond these two options, plus both have beaches with swimming access that are dog friendly during the tourism off-season (i.e. No dogs off leash on the sand between June 1 and September 15). However, there are spots along the water in both locations where a canine (or person) could take a swim to cool off during the summer. Trails can be busy at peak times, such as sunny nice weekends, so stimulation in these areas will vary depending on time of day and weather conditions. Remember that it’s not always just activity level that can be stimulating: For some canines, simply the sights and smells of a quiet park trail can offer new and novel experiences and present a level of stimulation that a caregiver needs to be aware of while training and proofing.

I’d love to hear your great suggestions of places to take and train your dog in and around Victoria. Where are your favorite spots?

Canines By Design works with clients in all of these locations, plus many more, on Vancouver Island. Where are your “proofing” tough spots? Check out our list of canine services, including on-location proofing, and then call me to talk about a consultation! #caninesbydesign Caninesbydesign.ca

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